Archive for the ‘Advice’ Category

Resilient Tree

Posted: July 4, 2012 in Advice, General

Author – Joe Mulumba 

At the heart of Africa, with its luxurious forest that gives planet the necessary lungs to survive, my beloved country Congo rests. When these white men brought their Bible, guns, and stuffed up piece of clothes, they envied these precious stones that our land has always carried. Our chiefs and leaders at the time didn’t know and couldn’t understand to what extent the threat was. When agreement couldn’t be reached, they were quickly dismissed. In the 1950s, African students all over Africa started agitating for freedom. Having received the Western education, they understood that in order to recover their own power, they had to give up their tribal allegiances and unite as a nation. Thousands of lives if not millions of lives were lost in the process to obtain independence. Lumumba was one of the students, ardent believer that no limb or life could be spared in order to fight for independence. His passion led him in jails and receive beatings but in June 1960, with the help of thousands men and women, Congo became free.

Before, during and after colonization, western powers have always used the divide to rein stratagem and not too long after we received our independence, they turned misunderstandings into power struggle between Moise Tshombe, Lumumba, Kasavubu and Mobutu and at the end, Mobutu came out on top, and started his Western powered reign for 35 years. The one legacy he would take from Lumumba is the maintaining of a nationalist spirit where Zairois and Zairoise of all tribes came to identify with their country and their leader.

When he wasn’t useful anymore to his Western allies, Mobutu was taken down and Kabila who took powers got killed a few years later because he sounded too communist for the liking of the Western interests. Kabila Jr. proved himself and is still proving very understanding of those interests of his Western allies to the point that Uganda and Rwanda have made of the East of Congo, their hunting grounds just because they are friendly with the same Western allies that support him.

Rape of women and men, malnutrition, homelessness, prostitution, lack of education, lack of roads and infrastructures, and the list goes on ad nauseam, but despite it all, hope for Congo can’t be quenched.  Every day, healthcare professionals, activists, musicians, artists and débrouillards find ways to make a difference in someone’s life. The spirit that animated Lumumba is still animating many of our vibrant Congolese youth who excel at home and abroad in all disciplines, attaining for themselves and their nations the necessary intellectual tools to match their indomitable spirit to see a better Congo.

I know that a Google search on Congo only gives the grim news, but I know not only from my family that still lives there, but from all those years I grew up there, that Congolese are resilient. Our musical, intellectual talent and our beautiful spirit haven’t been diminished by all the trials and it falls upon each and every one of us to see to it that those deaths of innocent civilians and other warriors for freedom weren’t in vain by digging in our pockets and thinking hard about our place in Congo’s future. It’s all about saving one life, one day at a time while pressuring the political leaders to implement the needed changes.

Femmes d’affaires, chefs d’Etats, artistes ou défenseurs de l’environnement… les femmes africaines occupent aujourd’hui tous les terrains. Par leurs actions quotidiennes, elles oeuvrent au développement du continent. Le succès et les carrières exceptionnelles de certaines d’entre elles en font des personnalités incontournables sur le continent. Portraits de six femmes d’influence…

Source: http://www.afriqueavenir.org/2011/08/08/ces-femmes-qui-font-bouger-l’afrique/

Wangari Maathai et la muraille verte

Wangari Maathai est la première africaine a avoir obtenu le très prestigieux prix Nobel de la paix, en 2004, pour «sa contribution en faveur du développement durable, de la démocratie et de la paix». En 1977, elle a fondé le mouvement de la Ceinture verte qui a commencé par planter modestement sept arbres. Soutenu par les femmes, leGreen Belt Movement a réussi à planter 30 millions d’arbres en trente ans afin de prévenir l’érosion des sols, devenant ainsi le plus grand projet de reboisement en Afrique. Et la militante écologiste a gagné un surnom: «tree woman», la femme des arbres. «Nous n’avons le droit ni de fatiguer ni de renoncer», aime à dire Wangari Maathai pour qui l’écologie, le féminisme, la politique, la lutte pour la paix et contre la pauvreté veulent dire la même chose.

Posted: May 2, 2012 in Advice, General

We believe the solutions to Congo’s problems come from those living within them.

Making a Change

Posted: March 26, 2012 in Advice, General

Author – Joe Mulumba 

Create businesses, education centers, engineering projects, agricultural projects that have cultural roots embedded and replayed over and over ad nauseam. Advertisements must always align cultural values with financial goals of selling the product. The land must be worked. The meat, the fish, must be provided. Electricity and water must be privatized.

There are three sectors of growth for the Congo to be the proud, strong, and powerful nation that it ought to be: The political sector: With the third election that just took place in Congo’s history, our generation is slowly awakening to the rights and privileges that ought to be granted to them as deserving citizens of a rich nation. The cultural sector: you can only go as far and as up only as far your roots are deep. Artists, writers, fashion designers, actors, directors, painters and everyone related to the cultural wealth of our nation ought to produce works that will inspire and galvanize the population into producing, manufacturing Congolese products and back and forth.

“We must always be political. I think that culture, for example is always very political. It always has been and always will be….because a culture represents the values, the values for which one fights. If one is fighting for a revolution, one is talking about more than just changing governments and power, and that is changing the value system. What carries that value system is one’s culture….Culture is a cohesive force. It is what keeps people together. Culture is very important in the fight, because a lot of people have fought against their oppressors yet maintained the culture of their oppressors, and culturally they are the same as their oppressors. They haven’t fought for anything actually. All they have done is change powers, but that is not a revolution.

You have to understand that changing powers is not a revolution. Black people in America, Africans who live in America, especially must understand that and begin to alienate our people completely from the culture and values of Western society. That is going to be particularly difficult because all of us live within those values and it is going to be very hard for us to root them out. I mean that it is like people who say that they want to be be black. But being black is an awfully hard job in the United States. It is very, very difficult, and we have to constantly try to understand the rejection of Western values and the pickup of new values. It is very, very difficult. But our first task is all the more to alienate our people at every chance we get from the Western culture and values, because once they are alienated there will be no influence over them. That is what we are seeking. We are seeking to stop all influence of Western culture on our people — completely.” Kwame Toure (land and power)

You can’t look in the future, if you can’t look in the past. These elections were just a blip. Joseph Kabila is a blip. His father was a blip. Mobutu was a blip. Lumumba’s legacy will live on. The concept of a nation: a community formed by its ethnic identity, religion, language, and culture is still new in Africa. 50 years. Just a toddler compared to other nations; the heritage of colonialism and of those pre nation times before colonialism still slow down to the process of building a nation. A lot of us young Congolese sometimes don’t realize our place in history and in the history of our country. It is necessary to pull back as far back as possible and as forward as possible to start thinking in terms of generations instead of our own personal career goals.

We are to embrace the fate of our nation on our shoulders. Doctors, engineers, soldiers, preachers, writers, poets, musicians, activists, entrepreneurs, political leaders, we all have a stone to place to build the nation. We have to be single minded in our pursuit, in our thirst, in our hunger, in our trials, in our wounds and in our deaths. The intellectual and the bourgeois elite has to come to an understanding to be single minded in the destruction of opposition’s forces to Congo and to the support of creative and nurturing endeavors for the Congo. The proletariat, the people has the hunger, the thirst for a leader, for resources to be available to take part in the fight, in the building of a different nation. It will take love, money, leadership, wounds, prayers, medicines, determination, sacrifice but it will happen. We may not see it. Our children may not see it. Our grand children may not see it, but our grand grand children will see it.

Congolese children born in the diaspora, Congolese studying abroad, Congolese with the pockets to go and come as they want should be bringing back home not just western delicacies, but essentials for deprived communities and critical minds to seemingly impossible situations on the ground. We have to connect and keep alive the lines of communication between all Congolese seeking to build a better Congo. We have to recognize and promote the services, the talents, the people who will improve on building the Congo. There are thousand, nameless and selfless workers at different sectors of our nation in education, in religion, in politics, in science, in health, in military who are all in search of a better Congo.

The identification of our skills and talents is a preliminary, but once that’s done, there’s no question as to what should be the purpose of our actions. As a writer, I intend to publish again and again and again against the atrocities, the corruption, the inaptitude of current Congolese leaders and celebrate those who fight selflessly to the peril of their lives to build a better Congo. It will take time. It will take lifetimes, but the fight has to start now. Every morning. Every evening. Every day. Until we honor those who came before us and create a future for our children.

We deliver, we are in no way imposing any views or opinions to our audience.  Feel free to watch and construct your own viewpoints. 

Original Post:  Joseph Kony Is Still At Large and It’s all My Fault.

Posted on March 9, 2012

Author – Mind of Malaka

I generally like to reserve Friday posts for frivolity, but I have been requested to give my view on KONY2012. Please brace yourself for a rant.

Let’s call Joseph Kony what he is: a narcissist, a pedophile and a terrorist. Virtually unchecked, Joseph Kony has been carrying out his campaign of terror against innocent African civilians in Uganda, Sudan and the DRC since 1986. He and his goons have destroyed hundreds of thousands of lives, raped countless numbers of women and girls, and ripped families apart. His tools are his power of persuasion, and that failing, the barrel of the gun. For over 20 years, this one man – who in interviews described himself as God Almighty – has maimed, pillaged and burned the homes and bodies of innocents while the world twiddled their thumbs.

Now comes this #stopkony / KONY2012 campaign, spearheaded by a group of white kids who hail from California. Their singular focus lies in the capture and conviction of Joseph Kony by the end of this year. And God bless them for it.

Can I speak plainly, reader? I am SO SICK of Black people and their twisted dogma concerning the “White Savior” Syndrome. Oh, you haven’t heard of it? It’s the belief in certain circles of the Black Intelligencia that because Black folk can’t do for themselves, White people have to come in and do for them, or more specifically, solve our problems for us. In the case of Joseph Kony in particular, one rather prolific individual on twitter summed up the KONY2012 (and implied White savior Campaign) movement by saying “the world exists simply to satisfy the needs – including, importantly, the sentimental needs – of white people and Oprah”. Prior to that, he says that “the white savior supports brutal policies in the morning, founds charities in the afternoon, and receives awards in the evenings.” This message has been retweeted quite a few times on Twitter, and I do see why. At first glance, this all sounds very witty and well thought out until you think about it, at which point you grasp your head and shout:

Oh My GOD, Black people!!

We decry any effort to stereotype and homogenize us as a race, and then we turn around and do the same thing to white people? Just stop and think. Look at the world around you. The vast majority of people who identify with the Occupy Wall Street Movement are WHITE. The people that they are on a crusade AGAINST are WHITE. How then can we lump all white people together as saying they fund our brutal policies and then swoop in to try and save us from them? It’s an insipid argument, and one that must cease immediately, for it makes us look foolish. How would you react to the assertion that sh*t and chocolate share the same properties, simply because both are brown? Exactly.

All these Africans, sitting at home behind your laptops and your Black Berries, carrying on about how White people will not leave us to our own devices: You all make me SICK. If the victims of Joseph Kony’s terrorist acts were the children of MPs and businessmen, he would have been disposed of long ago. If Joseph Kony expanded his reach into the streets of Pretoria and was brutalizing young white South African children, I wager that there wouldn’t be a jungle dense enough to conceal him. If the people he was killing and raping were of “value”, African governments would ferret him out! If Joseph Kony’s campaign was preventing Chinese “investment” in the areas he is currently pillaging, there would be a special force unit whose only job was to secure his capture.

Here’s the rub. The only people at fault for not bringing Kony in is AFRICANS. What I’m about to say is an “oversimplification” of events, but I don’t have time to give anyone a history lesson, because you’re intelligent enough to do your own research.

We got our independence. We’ve since elected leaders whose only goal for their positions is to rule for life. Africa is not poor, but these leaders exacerbate the image and façade of poverty in order to garner foreign aid, much of which they pocket for themselves and their cronies. They then leave the reviled common man to fend for himself, providing just enough of the very basics in terms of public facilities to give the illusion of a working developing city. Joseph Kony lives in this barely bourgeoning East African city. He goes to public school and is an altar boy, perhaps he’s been sexually assaulted by a priest, perhaps not, I don’t know. But at some point he has a psychotic break because he thinks he’s God. Somehow he gets a hold of some uniforms and some guns, and armed with scripture he decides he’s going to establish a theocratic state based on the Ten Commandments. Somehow, “thou shalt not kill” escapes him, but that’s only a minor detail. He pursues his dream of molesting little kids and eating their parents anyway.

Oh Black people. You like to complain and criticize. But where is the action, eh?? Why are we not staging sit- ins at our Ghanaian embassies around the world, demanding that OUR president take a firm stance on Kony until he’s captured. Why are Nigerians, Gambians and Kenyan’s not doing the same? Why are we not speaking out until our voices are impossible to ignore? Here’s a better question: Why did an AFRICAN not start the Kony2012 campaign? It’s because you people care, yes, but you don’t care enough

When the Save Darfur campaign was at its height, who did we see out on the Washington Mall at those rallies? White students! There was a sprinkling of Blacks here and there, but not en masse as it should have been. These are our brothers and sisters after all!

As a continent, we are guided by fear and mistrust of each other, and it is reflected in the leadership we appoint to govern us. We have few visionaries, and fewer leaders with balls. By the time we have a Laurent Gbagbo refusing to step down after losing an election, there is no appealing to the better side of such a man. He HAS no better side. So what did our ECOWAS leadership do? They threatened military action against him, but it was all talk, as usual. Gbagbo was not ousted until the French intervened. Was this a White Savior Complex? Hardly. It was yet another manifestation of Pervasive Black Apathy.

All this chatter about the group Invisible Children, heh? Instead of talking about the “damage” this video has done, has anyone given as much energy into discussing how to bring this man to justice? Why is Uganda now pointing at what the video has done “wrong” instead of discussing what they themselves have been doing wrong these last 26 years? MSTEW!!! If you really want to make a difference on the continent, stop sitting on your Black asses and bitching about what White people are doing. We have film makers. We have photographers. We have WRITERS. Any of these people could have brought attention to this issue, which is not a new one. Lisa Ling did a report on Joseph Kony is 2006! But just like the short lived outrage over blood diamonds, that too escaped our consciousness. Stop knocking people for caring.

Oh Black people. You like to complain and criticize. But where is the action, eh?? Why are we not staging sit- ins at our Ghanaian embassies around the world, demanding that OUR president take a firm stance on Kony until he’s captured. Why are Nigerians, Gambians and Kenyan’s not doing the same? Why are we not speaking out until our voices are impossible to ignore? Here’s a better question: Why did an AFRICAN not start the Kony2012 campaign? It’s because you people care, yes, but you don’t care enough

When the Save Darfur campaign was at its height, who did we see out on the Washington Mall at those rallies? White students! There was a sprinkling of Blacks here and there, but not en masse as it should have been. These are our brothers and sisters after all!

As a continent, we are guided by fear and mistrust of each other, and it is reflected in the leadership we appoint to govern us. We have few visionaries, and fewer leaders with balls. By the time we have a Laurent Gbagbo refusing to step down after losing an election, there is no appealing to the better side of such a man. He HAS no better side. So what did our ECOWAS leadership do? They threatened military action against him, but it was all talk, as usual. Gbagbo was not ousted until the French intervened. Was this a White Savior Complex? Hardly. It was yet another manifestation of Pervasive Black Apathy.

All this chatter about the group Invisible Children, heh? Instead of talking about the “damage” this video has done, has anyone given as much energy into discussing how to bring this man to justice? Why is Uganda now pointing at what the video has done “wrong” instead of discussing what they themselves have been doing wrong these last 26 years? MSTEW!!! If you really want to make a difference on the continent, stop sitting on your Black asses and bitching about what White people are doing. We have film makers. We have photographers. We have WRITERS. Any of these people could have brought attention to this issue, which is not a new one. Lisa Ling did a report on Joseph Kony is 2006! But just like the short lived outrage over blood diamonds, that too escaped our consciousness. Pick a side. Either be a part of the problem or be an agent for the solution, but for God’s sake stop knocking people for caring.

Author – Aurelie 

There has been so much that has happened since November 2011,  that I almost don’t know where to start or what to talk about. What I will concentrate on is my own reflection and theory regarding Congo’s current state and possible future.

We have been marching, protesting, blocking traffic on highways and bridges and yet this falls on deaf ears or we are simply side stepped and overlooked as you would a dog’s feces on a sidewalk. However, let a white man make a video about how his NGO, throw in a few crying children turned child soldiers, and a new villain for people to hate, because we all seem to love a good villain.

This started out as a simple project that made the social networking rounds, and ended up catching the attention of the entire world, including over 40 million you tube views and counting. It seems so odd to me how a human’s suffering can become sensationalized. The bad guy of the hour in the storyline is Joseph Kony, same first name as Joseph Kabila, I wonder if there’s a pattern here!

This man has been committing crimes against humanity, recruiting children as child soldiers and little girls as sex slaves for 26 years! It is now 2012 why the sudden interest? Why get involved in a situation that is not on American soil when its foreign policy is less than desirable? Why chase a guy around that was provided weapons made in America to better torment the Ugandan people? Personally I feel that this is a big distraction that the American government has spear headed to again cover the truth and distract the population from its true motive.

I feel bringing American troops to help the Ugandan government, whom by the way the international criminal court has charged with countless war crimes and humanity atrocities, find Kony is their way into Central Africa. I feel that if we the people are not careful we may soon be watching Congo slip from our fingers this time in a more permanent way. With European leaders descending upon the DRC to start talks with Kabila on the future of this country more so proves what may happen, the Berlin conference of 1885 only this time with different players.

My theory is a mass recolonization of Africa, for economical gain by the western forces. While Europe and America are walking a thin line on a barely stable economy, all the motives are there. It is time that the African diaspora re-evaluates the strategy of what needs to be done, so that we treat this situation with more urgency than a few marches and conferences. It is highly important that we unite or we could very well go back to modern day slavery.

Dawn of a New Age

Posted: March 26, 2012 in Advice, General

Author – Carmen Dibaya 

It is officially the end of the world…as we once knew it! The Mayan prophesied that the world would end in 2012. Well not exactly 2012 more like December 21, 2012, so don’t freak out just yet, you have lots more time till then. I’m not going to get into the details of the Mayan calendar and how they came up with this specific date, you can search that up on your spare time.  But just so that we are all on the same page, the Mesoamerican Long Count Calendar (aka the Mayan Calendar) is based on 20 Katun cycles known as Baktum; our current calendrical cycle is the 13th Baktun cycle. According to the Mayans, the 13th cycle is due to end on the 21 of December of this year…

So this natural order of our universe has brought about various interpretations, one being that this date will simply mark the start of time in which the earth and its inhabitants, us, will undergo a positive physical or spiritual transformation. Others however infer that it’s the much-prophesied Apocalypse, the doomsday end where the earth will be swallowed up by a black hole or destroyed by a passing asteroid.

I personally prefer the former interpretation, the idea of being destroyed by an asteroid before my prime isn’t too appealing. However, undergoing a positive physical and or spiritual transformation, whatever that may be, sounds more thought provoking.  Not only does the former account seem more alluring, it is the only explanation that seems to embody the essence of this New Year. 2012. Of this I was convinced after observing how the series of events that took place all through last year gave way to the beginning of a new era of consciousness and civil resistance.

We witnessed the dawn of the Arab Spring early last year with civil uprisings of North African Nations; one after the other, citizens demonstrated, marched, rallied and made use of social medias to mobilize and forced rulers out of power demanding the resignation of the old regimes.  This movement, which captured global attention, not only inspired, but set forth a snowball effect that led to Palestinians officially requesting a United Nation membership and State recognition, to the capturing and killing of Qaddafi, to the Occupy Wall Street protest movement and later the Russian protest, the Nigerian fuel protest and now the Kony2012 campaign.

For the sake of the length of this article, I purposefully did not mention every major event that took place the previous year. But what I wanted to get at with mentioning the successions of revolts that began with and followed the Arab Spring was the Congolese Election that took place last November.  As it is generic with African politics, the elections fell short of everyone’s optimistic expectations. Although it shouldn’t have come as a surprise, still many of us couldn’t help but feel that this presidential election was going to be the FIRST free and fair election in the history of Congo since its independence.

Devastation, disappointment and despair lingered somberly in the spirit of citizens of this war torn nation. For a brief second, it seemed as if everything had stopped … crickets … at this moment, Congolese people found themselves at the crossroads. Here, the laissez-faire attitude that was accustomed to in the past was no longer an option. You see something had change, something was different, I would like to think that the momentum of the snowball effect sparked the spirit of sub-Saharan Africans to believe that they too could fight for their freedom and challenge the political powers.

United for a common cause, Congolese home and in the diaspora took the streets of Kinshasa, Johannesburg, Brussels, Paris, London, Montreal, D.C. to challenge the result of the elections suspected of fraud. Their efforts fell short at the international front, it seem as if the enthusiasm had run dry and the humongous “snowball” had come to a full stop at the gates of Congo with no one in sight to crack open the bolted doors.

I’m discouraging you from thinking that Congolese people were less equipped to carry out an impactful revolution like that of the Arab Spring. They were very much capable. However, actions alone cannot change a deeply rooted handicap that is the Congolese attitude and the African mindset: “too much intrigue; lots of intolerance; too little selflessness.” This rigid impediment had the Congolese revolution predisposed for failure.  We took the streets, we sang, we marched, we waved banners and posters, lost our voices and emptied our eyes of tears and withstood the cold winter winds, all so radical and all so heroic…but a true revolution is not one that is fueled with volatile emotions rather one that transforms the mind, attitude and course of conduct. This is where we fell short.

Because I’m naturally optimistic, it’s only right for me to say that Congo will see better days and that it will regain not only a say in the allocation of its natural resources but its dignity. However, my pragmatic side knows that it is all bull. Congo will continue to suffer as long as its people are unwilling to self-analyze and change from inside out. We need to drop the slave mentality, Belgium left out lands half a century ago, why are we so freely allowing them to occupy the premises of our minds after we fought for our independence on blood, sweat and tears???!

Congo has tremendous potentials (politically, economically and culturally), but the distrustful attitude, selfishness tendencies, distastefulness for anything African and belief that prosperity is only attainable in the West mentality represented in the silhouette of tradition and conveyed as a social standard needs to STOP.

There is much that needs to be done, an arduous task to say the least, but a necessary one. We can chose to either embrace the possibility of a positive transformation: mental as well as spiritual, that is marked with the end of the 13th Baktun cycle or be swallowed by the black hole that is our ignorance and inability to change. Its 2012 have your pick.

I know that my tone of voice might have been a bit harsh and condescending, but very much needed. I’m not the type to sugar coat anything for the sake of pleasing and gaining the good favors of my peers. Criticism is the one thing that we can never have enough of, especially when it’s a constructive one.

There Is Hope

Posted: February 11, 2012 in Advice, General, Uncategorized

Author – Joe Mulumba 

You can’t look in the future, if you can’t look in the past. These elections is a blip. Joseph Kabila is a blip. His father was a blip. Mobutu was a blip. Lumumba’s legacy will live on.

The concept of a nation: a community formed by its ethnic identity, religion, language, and culture is still new in Africa. 50 years. Just a toddler compared to other nations. The heritage of colonialism and of those pre nation times before colonialism still slow down to the process of building a nation. A lot of us young Congolese sometimes don’t realize our place in history and in the history of our country. It is necessary to pull back as far back as possible and as forward as possible to start thinking in terms of generations instead of our own personal career goals.

We are to embrace the fate of our nation on our shoulders. Doctors, engineers, soldiers, preachers, writers, poets, musicians, activists, entrepreneurs, political leaders, we all have a stone to place to build the nation. We have to be single minded in our pursuit, in our thirst, in our hunger, in our trials, in our wounds and in our deaths. The intellectual and bourgeois elite has to come to an understanding to be single minded in the destruction of oppositions forces to Congo and to the support of creative and nurturing endeavors for the Congo. The proletariat, the people has the hunger, the thirst for a leader, for resources to be available to take part in the fight, in the building of a different nation. It will take love, money, leadership, wounds, prayers, medicines, determination, sacrifice but it will happen. We may not see it. Our children may not see it. Our grand children may not see it, but our grand grand children will see it.

Congolese children born in the diaspora, Congolese studying abroad, Congolese with the pockets to go and come as they want should be bringing back home not just western delicacies, but essentials for deprived communities and critical minds to seemingly impossible situations on the ground.

We have to connect and keep alive the lines of communication between all Congolese seeking to build a better Congo. We have to recognize and promote the services, the talents, the people who will improve on building the Congo. There are thousand, nameless and selfless workers at different sectors of our nation in education, in religion, in politics, in science, in health, in military who are all in search of a better Congo.

We have to stop thinking that we are alone and if there’s a lesson to be learned from these past elections is that we are not alone. It’s a matter of organizing the ressources. If Kabila is to bring mercenaries, lets find mercenaries to deal with mercenaries. I am a writer and I deal with critical thinking in visual and written form. I don’t know how to handle and don’t want to learn how to handle a gun, but these times might call for me to leave my ivory tower and get down in the streets, but ultimately it’s not my primary role.

The identification of our skills and talents is a preliminary, but once that’s done, there’s no question as to what should be the purpose of our actions. As a writer, I intend to publish again and again and again against the atrocities, the corruption, the inaptitude of current Congolese leaders and celebrate those who fight selflessly to the peril of their lives to build a better Congo.

It will take time. It will take lifetimes, but the fight has to start now. Every morning. Every evening. Every day. Until we honor those who came before us and create a future for our children.

Cher Congolais…

Posted: February 11, 2012 in Advice, General

Ce message a ete prise a partir d’un groupe de congolais sur facebook. Que pensez-vous? un peu trop severe?

Nous sommes (NOUS DIASPORA ) autant coupables que nos frères du pays qui jouent les passifs par excéllence.
Pourquoi? Parce que nous avons été irresponsables pendant toutes ses années.Comment avons nous été irresponsables ? En envoyant aveuglement notre argent à nos familles. Nous avons contribué à les rendre passives.
Comment expliquer qu’une population à 80% chômeuse arrive à enrichir (quand nous nous appauvrissons) , les brasseries, les prêt – à – porter et les musiciens? Et bien mes chers voici à quoi sert notre argent : à acheter les primus, les jeep de nos musiciens,remplir les boutiques de prêt – à –porter.
Nous parlons de sacrifice? Voici le SACRIFICE à faire arrêter d’envoyer (AVEUGLEMENT) de l’argent au pays. Il faut réduire le flux monétaire dans ce pays et créer la rage . Nous aidons ce gouvernement irresponsable en envoyant chaque année plus que ce qu’il a comme budget. Je sais que beaucoup (SURTOUT CEUX QUI ONT L’ESPRIT CONSTIPE) vont me dire que c’est fou comme idée , qu’on ne peut laisser mourir nos familles et bla bla bla , To salisa pendant trop longtemps ,résultat eza que to za l’échec na monde. Notre aide n’est donc pas une solution pour notre pays mais un sérieux problème .
Ba ndeko prenons ceci au sérieux si on veut voir un changement .